Unusual exploration within velocity

ITA  Italiano

 THE EDITORIAL PROJECT AND THE TWELVE WORKS

PRESENTATION - This project’s goal is to “explore” velocity and to inspire considerations about the changes that it has gone through in the past two centuries. There is no attempt to condemn nor exalt it, but to analyze it in an unusual way. The choice of the adjective “unusual” comes from a will to unite art and the thoughts of esteemed university professors. They contributed their analyses of the concept of velocity to the project, from the point of view of their own disciplines. The areas chosen may seem distant from the fine arts, but that distance disappears when the same cross-cutting subject is considered from diverse angles, especially a concept like this one, whose development is so closely intertwined with the evolution of our society.

arte-pittura_contemporanea-italiana_bologna

CONSIDERATIONS - after carefully observing the metamorphosis of man’s behavior in the past two centuries, there seems to be a clear relationship between individual behavioral changes and the progress of velocity and the social dynamics it has introduced through discoveries in mechanics, technology and science. The crucial genesis of the process of “speeding up” our society coincides with the large-scale use of the combustion motor in manufacturing, transportation, communication, etc… Later, in the second half of the twentieth century, the breakneck increase in speed was spurned by the development of technology; effectively desensitizing individuals to the continuous evolution of speed. We can describe the development of speed in our civilization in three phases. The first phase, or cycle of “natural velocity” is that in which man lives simply with natural resources and exists in complete harmony with the environment. In this phase, human beings live in terms of nature’s speed, respecting the natural limits (this phase is the same for all civilizations). The second phase begins with the invention of motors. For the first time, man breaks the barrier of nature’s velocity, with the help of machines run by motors and their various applications, transforming manufacturing, transportation and communication. This change modified a balance that lasted millenniums, a balance that regulated the velocity relationship between human beings and the environment. The new phase gave birth to “mechanical velocity”. After a brief period, we plunged into the third phase, which we gained after mastering mechanical speed. It is the cycle called “absolute velocity”. With mass use of the telephone, television, internet (and digital technology in general), we pulverize the concept of “vehicle” every day. We are in the phase where “vehicle” has lost all importance. Physically moving the subject is no longer necessary. Thanks to man’s metamorphosis, which comes directly from his relationship with velocity, our historical cycle seems unique. In other words, it cannot be compared to other civilizations because it is the only one to have known first “mechanical velocity” and then “absolute velocity”. Why does contemporary man thirst so for velocity? Why doesn’t he extricate himself from this crazy race? I feel there are many reasons. Surely one reason is that man has become a cog, imprisoned in an relentless mechanism that he himself has created. He cannot free himself of it in most of the things he does; in his work, he must run to stay competitive, or in the case of employees, they must rush so as not to get fired from their jobs. And what about the people we see rushing even when it’s not necessary, like during their free time or as they explore entertaining activities, what explanation is there for that? Things are different in this case, because while velocity is brought on by a lifestyle forced on us from the higher spheres, it is still possible toVelocità Assoluta I refuse. I think that acquiescing to this frenetic rush even when we can avoid it, is fruit of the individual’s unconscious desire to live as much as possible, as if to exorcise his or her fear of death. I have posited my “Accordion Theory” on this subject, where the musician increases the number of folds in his instrument in order to increase the possible extension; obviously that extension could never exceed that of the length of the musician’s arms, and the probable result is merely a worse sound quality of the instrument. Once, when reflection and spirituality had an important role in society, the theme of eternal life was a part of this sphere and it was examined and explored with the canons and principles appropriate to this subject; today materialism prevails and in our attempt to control everything, the “accordion effect” appears to be an inappropriate human reaction, part of our atavistic search for immortality. Why does contemporary man thirst so for velocity? Why doesn’t he extricate himself from this crazy race? I feel there are many reasons. Surely one reason is that man has become a cog, imprisoned in an relentless mechanism that he himself has created. He cannot free himself of it in most of the things he does; in his work, he must run to stay competitive, or in the case of employees, they must rush so as not to get fired from their jobs. And what about the people we see rushing even when it’s not necessary, like during their free time or as they explore entertaining activities, what explanation is there for that? Things are different in this case, because while velocity is brought on by a lifestyle forced on us from the higher spheres, it is still possible to refuse. I think that acquiescing to this frenetic rush even when we can avoid it, is fruit of the individual’s unconscious desire to live as much as possible, as if to exorcise his or her fear of death. I have posited my “Accordion Theory” on this subject, where the musician increases the number of folds in his instrument in order to increase the possible extension; obviously that extension could never exceed that of the length of the musician’s arms, and the probable result is merely a worse sound quality of the instrument. Once, when reflection and spirituality had an important role in society, the theme of eternal life was a part of this sphere and it was examined and explored with the canons and principles appropriate to this subject; today materialism prevails and in our attempt to control everything, the “accordion effect” appears to be an inappropriate human reaction, part of our atavistic search for immortality.

T H E Y   W R I T T E N   T H E   C R I T I C A L   P A R T

Gregorio Rossi
Curator of the Museum of Italian Contemporary Art in America
Curator of the “Nature and dreams” pavilion - 53rd edition of the Venice Biennale of Art

Christian Parisot
President of the Amedeo Modigliani Institut Archives Lègales - Paris – Rome

Chiara Filippini
former Researcher at the Amedeo Modigliani Institut Archives Lègales - Paris – Rome
former Curator of the Documentation and Research Center Amedeo Modigliani

Roberto Sabatelli
former Director of the Amedeo Modigliani Art Gallery

T H E Y   H A V E   W R I T T E N   A B O U T
T H E   I N F L U E N C E   O F   V E L O C I T Y

Professor Kenneth H. Keller
Director and Professor of Johns Hopkins University
School of Advanced International Studies - Bologna

Professor Gianfranco Pasquino
Full Professor of "Political Sciences" - Department of Political Sciences
University of Bologna - Johns Hopkins University

Professor Antonino Galloni
former Professor of "Economics" Berkeley University (California) - L.U.I.S.S.
Catholic University of the Sacred Heart (MI) - University of Rome - University of Modena

Professor Fabrizio Politi
Dean of the Faculty of Economics - Full Professor of "Constitutional Law"
University of L'Aquila

Professor Gaetano Bonetta
Dean of the Faculty of Education - Ordinary of "General Pedagogy"
"G. D'Annunzio" University of Chieti and Pescara

Professor Raffaele Bugiardini
Full Professor of "Diseases of the Cardiovascular System" - Faculty of Medicine and Surgery
University of Bologna

Professor Pierluigi Giordani
former Full Professor of "Urban Planning" - Department of Urban Architecture and Survey
University of Padua

Professor Silvio Bergia
formerly Full Professor in the disciplinary group of "Theoretical Physics"
Department of Physics - University of Bologna

Professor Gianfranco Bartalotta
Full Professor of "History of Theater and Entertainment"
Faculty of Education - Roma Tre University
Full Professor of "Methodologies and techniques of the globality of languages"
Faculty of Education - Unisu Telematic University

Professor Mauro Catenacci
Full Professor of "Criminal Law" - Faculty of Law
University of Teramo

Professor Gianluca Tagliamonte
Professor of "Etruscology and Italic Antiquities"
Department of Cultural Heritage - University of Salento - Lecce

Professoressa Renata Nemola
Professor of "Piano Accompaniment" and "Accompaniment Practice"
Conservatory "Gian Battista Martini" of Bologna

Professor Francesco Romeo
Professor of "Philosophy of Law" - Department of Legal Sciences
"G. D'Annunzio" University of Chieti and Pescara

T H E   1 2   W O R K S

N a t u r a l    V e l o c i t y

Velocità Naturale IValocità Naturale IIValocità Naturale IIIValocità Naturale IV

M e c h a n i c a l    V e l o c i t y

Velocità Meccanica IVelocità Meccanica IIVelocità Meccanica IIIVelocità Meccanica IV

A b s o l u t e    V e l o c i t y

Velocità Assoluta IVelocità Assoluta IIVelocità Assoluta IIIVelocità Assoluta IV

T H E   B O O K   W A S   A C Q U I R E D   B Y

Amedeo Modigliani Institut Archives Lègales – Paris–Roma
Palazzo Taverna – Rome – Italy

The Pollock–Krasner Foundation Inc.
Park Avenue – New York

MAMbo
Museum of Modern Art of Bologna – Bologna – Italy

Michetti Museum and Foundation
Palazzo San Domenico – Francavilla al mare – Italy

Johns Hopkins University
Bologna – Italy

Biblioteca dell'Accademia di Belle Arti di Bologna
Bologna – Italy

Biblioteca Comunale degli Intronati
Palazzo della Sapienza – Siena – Italy

Istituto Europeo Pegaso
Foggia – Italia

Museum of Italian Contemporary Art in America
Embassy of Italy in Costa Rica – San Josè – Costa Rica

Argentine Embassy in Italy – Rome
Segreteria dei Diritti Umani – Rome – Italy

Chamber of Deputies – Palazzo Montecitorio
Bureau of the Chamber of Deputies – Rome – Italy

Presidency of the Italian Republic – Palazzo del Quirinale
Quirinale Office for the Conservation of Artistic Heritage – Rome – Italy



THE "ARTE MONDADORI" MONTHLY - THE PAGE DEDICATED TO THE PROJECT

"Unusual exploration within velocity"
is an editorial work by Andrea Benetti sponsored by

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